Definitions of poetic devices

An allegory is a symbolism device where the meaning of a greater, often abstract, concept is conveyed with the aid of a more corporeal object or idea being used as an example. Usually a rhetoric device, an allegory suggests a meaning via metaphoric examples.

Definitions of poetic devices

After all, poets are trying to use a concentrated blend of sound and imagery to create an emotional response. The words and their order should evoke images, and the words themselves have sounds, which can reinforce or otherwise clarify those images.

These definitions, by the way, come by way of the Glossary of Poetic Terms, which can be found on the Internet at http: In words of two or more syllables, one syllable is almost invariably stressed more strongly than the other syllables. Words of one syllable may be either stressed or unstressed, depending on the context in which they are used, but connective one-syllable words like, and, but, or, to, etc.

The words in a line of poetry are usually arranged so the accents occur at regular intervals, with the meter defined by the placement of the accents within the foot. Accent Definitions of poetic devices not be construed as emphasis. Two degrees of accent are natural to many multisyllabic English words, designated as primary and secondary.

When a syllable is accented, it tends to be raised in pitch and lengthened. When the full accent falls on a vowel, as in PO-tion, that vowel is called a long vowel; when it falls on an articulation or consonant, as in POR-tion, the preceding vowel is a short vowel.

ALLITERATION Also called head rhyme or initial rhyme, the repetition of the initial sounds usually consonants of stressed syllables in neighboring words or at short intervals within a line or passage, usually at word beginnings, as in "wild and woolly" or the line from the poem, Darkness Lost: The sounds of alliteration produce a gratifying effect to the ear and can also serve as a subtle connection or emphasis of key words in the line, but should not "call attention" to themselves by strained usage.

Definitions of poetic devices

ASSONANCE The relatively close juxtaposition of the same or similar vowel sounds, but with different end consonants in a line or passage, thus a vowel rhyme, as in the words, date and fade. Also, the repetition of the same end consonants of words such as boat and night within or at the end of a line, or the words, cool and soul, as used by Emily Dickinson in the third stanza of He Fumbles at your Spirit.

Crawling, sprawling, breaching spokes of stone, Sidelight: Sound devices are important to poetic effects; to create sounds appropriate to the contentthe poet may sometimes prefer to achieve a cacophonous effect instead of the more commonly sought-for euphony.

Chris Baldick

The use of words with the consonants b, k and p, for example, produce harsher sounds than the soft f and v or the liquid l, m and n. It is achieved not only by the selection of individual word-sounds, but also by their relationship in the repetition, proximity, and flow of sound patterns.

Vowel sounds are generally more pleasing to the ear than the consonants, so a line with a higher ratio of vowel sounds will produce a more agreeable effect; also, the long vowels in words like moon and fate are more melodious than the short vowels in cat and bed.

His childhood fraught with lessons taught by want and misery METER A measure of rhythmic quantity, the organized succession of groups of syllables at basically regular intervals in a line of poetry, according to definite metrical patterns. In classic Greek and Latin versificationmeter depended on the way long and short syllables were arranged to succeed one another, but in English the distinction is between accented and unaccented syllables.

The unit of meter is the foot. Metrical lines are named for the constituent foot and for the number of feet in the line: Rarely does a metrical line exceed six feet.

In the composition of verse, poets sometimes make deviations from the systematic metrical patterns. This is often desirable because 1 variations will avoid the mechanical "te-dum, te-dum" monotony of a too-regular rhythm and 2 changes in the metrical pattern are an effective way to emphasize or reinforce meaning in the content.

These variations are introduced by substituting different feet at places within a line. Poets can also employ a caesurause run-on lines and vary the degrees of accent by skillful word selection to modify the rhythmic pattern, a process called modulation.

Accents heightened by semantic emphasis also provide diversity.Welcome to the website dedicated to literary devices (literary terms).Here you will find a list literary devices (literary terms) with definitions and examples.

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Please feel free to post your thoughts and vote on your favorite literary device. Start studying List of Poetic Devices. Learn vocabulary, terms, and more with flashcards, games, and other study tools. Poetic Devices April 4, By Mrs.

Destiny Beck (PA) These terms will help you identify devices in poetry and also be able to use them as you compose your own. SOUND DEVICES USED IN POETRY A List of Definitions Sound devices are resources used by poets to convey and reinforce the meaning or experience of poetry through the skillful use of sound.

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Poetry (the term derives from a variant of the Greek term, poiesis, "making") is a form of literature that uses aesthetic and rhythmic qualities of language—such as phonaesthetics, sound symbolism, and metre—to evoke meanings in addition to, or in place of, the prosaic ostensible meaning..

Definitions of poetic devices

Poetry has a long history, dating back to prehistorical times with the creation of hunting poetry .

Glossary of literary terms - Wikipedia